Shure SRH840 Professional Monitoring Headphones

Customer Ratings
Our Ratings
Overall Rating
Comfort & Fit
Noise Isolation
Build Quality
Bass - Lows
Vocals - Mids
Treble - Highs

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Customer Ratings
Our Ratings
Overall Rating
Comfort & Fit
Noise Isolation
Build Quality
Bass - Lows
Vocals - Mids
Treble - Highs
Customer Ratings
Our Ratings
Overall Rating
Comfort & Fit
Noise Isolation
Build Quality
Bass - Lows
Vocals - Mids
Treble - Highs

Overview

Shure SRH840 Professional Monitoring Headphones

The Shure SRH840 Professional Monitoring Headphones are brand-spankin-new on the market (which is why you should shop with Headphone Solutions... we're totally on the ball and we're offering these insanely cool licensed Shure headphones for less than any other authorized dealer). A little background on the headphones: Shure has an excellent reputation for earphones and microphones, and from what I've tested their products are truly exceptional. However, they have not made a niche for headphones. After many months of waiting for the unveiling of their top secret line, Shure finally released the SRH headphone series. The SRH840's is their top of the line headphone model, and I was anxious to get my paws on them and see if they live up to Shure’s earphone/microphone reputation. Let me first say that I tried these babies before I knew about the pricing, and I was completely blown away. The fit was outstanding. They are made for professional applications, so naturally they need some flexibility. However, the fit was a complete conundrum to me. I don’t understand how these uber-sturdy headphones can be soflexible. Twist em, turn em, swing from chandaliers with them - they won’t break and they feel unbelievably comfortable. I should also mention that they are practically wearing a fat suit - the padding is so soft, so supple, and so comfortable (even after long hours) that my head feels complete with them on. The headband also has a luxurious moisture-wicking fabric so you won't get sweaty when wearing them (and ladies, you won't have to worry about having a bad hair day). Now for the sound. Whew, the sound. It gave me wings. I tested the Shure SRH840’s with my iPod, professional mixer, and a studio amplifier – with all three, my heart melted just a little bit. It is detailed and controlled, yet rich, complex, and very natural sounding, even for closed-ear headphones. It is clear and crisp, and the bass is absolutely beautiful. Closed headphones rarely get the treble right, but these puppies definitely attended to that detail. For professionals that need to hear every last detail of their music, these headphones will fulfill your wildest dreams. Then I found out the price. Less than $200???? Are you sure you're not missing a 0??? Grab these suckers before they realize they misprinted the price!! For closed-ear headphones costing less than $200, I will venture to say that the Shure SRH840 Professional Monitoring Headphones may be the best I've heard yet. Over all, for an attempt at full sized headphones, Shure not only carves out a competitive spot in the market, but they completely demolish their fledgling competitors.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • For home listening and studio monitoring
  • Big bass, warm sound
  • 2 Year Warranty with ES Invoice
  • Very comfortable
  • Replacement set of ear pads included
  • Coiled cable oxygen-free copper

INCLUDES

  • SRH840 headphones
  • Set of replacement ear pads
  • Carrying bag
  • 1/4" (6.3mm) gold-plated adapter

Specifications

SRH840 Specifications

SRH840 Specs

  • Transducer type: Dynamic neodymium magnet
  • Driver size: 40 mm
  • Sensitivity (1kHz): 102 dB/mW
  • Impedance (1kHz): 44 Ω
  • Max. input power (1kHz): 1000 mW
  • Frequency range: 5 Hz - 25 kHz
  • Net weight (without cable): 0.7 lb (317.5 g)
  • Shipping weight: 1.75 lbs (794 g)
  • Length of cable: 3 meters (9.84 ft)
  • Type of cable: Detachable coiled oxygen-free copper
  • Plug: Gold-plated 1/8" (3.5 mm) stereo mini jack
  • Detachable Cable
  • Speaker Type: Dynamic
  • Sensitivity at 1kHz: 107dB SPL/mW
  • Impedance: 44 ohms
  • Cable Length: 10 ft
  • Cable Type: Coiled
  • Earcup Type: Full-size
  • Acoustic Seal: Closed
  • Frequency Range: 5-25,000HZ
  • Driver Size: 40mm

Reviews

Shure SRH840 Professional Monitoring Headphones Review by Earphone Solutions

Studio recording quality that many testers extimated at $350, the Shure SRH840 is a great solution not only for professionals but for audio enthusiasts and home use as well. The foldable desing and plush earcups are a big plus.

Customer Reviews

Summary of Customer Ratings & Reviews

OVERALL

20 out of 20 (100%) reviewers recommend this product

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Rating
Nickname
Mike48
Summary
Excellent by any standard -- outstanding for the price
Location
Portland, Oregon
Posted on
5/13/2013
Recommended?
Yes

I was looking for a pair of over-the-ear cans for use at work. I wanted good sound and some isolation -- both incoming, to enjoy the music more, and outgoing, so as not to disturb others. In looking at the reviews here and on other Web sites, I was drawn to the SRH840. Now I have them, I think they fit the bill perfectly. The sound is typical Shure (as I remember from many V-15 cartridges): realistically detailed, yet smooth and nonfatiguing; i.e., low distortion. I am using them with a good player (JRiver 18) on my laptop and a Meridian Explorer DAC. The combination gives real high-end sound at a manageable price. I did compare the Shures to my more expensive Sennheiser HD-650s at home, and the open-back Sennheisers do sound more open and slightly more detailed; but the difference is not night an day. So I would say, Shure has a winner here. Pros: Low distortion Good isolation at speech frequencies Smooth frequency response Non-fatiguing treble Cons: Slightly on the heavy side.

Rating
Nickname
Justin
Summary
Faithful
Location
Brooklyn, NY
Posted on
8/18/2012
Recommended?
Yes

The Shure 840, which retail for around $150, is a very faithful reproducer of one's LPs, CDs, and portable bits. They offer no exaggeration, good build quality and a fine warmth that does not offer any kind of bass boosting. If you prefer a sound that has the low-end, er, pronounced as one finds in the Beats by Dre line you will probably not enjoy these. They sound ruler flat. Of course, one can get even richer, fuller sound with greater "air" but you would need to spend MUCH (MUCH) more than this. I think they are exceedingly fine for $150. For $200 or more I would probably look at the Sennheiser line. Pros: The sound/resolution is very accurate: The studio monitor touts about these are not a misrepresentation. You hear the recording, even the warts, with zero bloat, bass boost or tipped-up highs. One might call these the anti-Bose. Cons: I've worn phones that had a more natural fit. These are a little tricky to wear with eyeglasses or if you are not sitting upright in a chair. (I like to slump or recline when the LP is spinning.) Those with contacts or stellar posture will be fine.

Rating
Nickname
Jim
Summary
Great for all around listening..........
Location
Martinez, CA
Posted on
5/2/2012
Recommended?
Yes

I bought these to use mainly for listening to TV & Music late at night. They work very well for this purpose with the exception of the 3.5 plug being a bit large so it doesn't fit my iPhone (that I use around the house when listening to music) when I have a case on it. I bought a small adapter at Radio Shack and solved the problem, so now I'm good to go! These phones are very comfortable and I can wear them for long periods of time with no problem. Pros: Sound, fit & price Cons: 3.5 plug base is big, doesn't fit iPhone without an adapter when a hard case is on the iPhone.

Rating
Nickname
David Brown
Summary
These are great for the money.
Location
California
Posted on
9/28/2011
Recommended?
Yes

The headphones have great detail especially in the high range and especially for what they cost. There is an absence of "warmth" that I am use to hearing from AKG or Sennheiser cans. Also these Shure headphones really could use an amp especially when using a mobile device as your music source. I have also found them to be just a bit on the heavy side. I like the plug in cord feature very useful and should contribute to the longevity of these headphones.Overall these are a great value, and a satisfactory listen. Pros: Great detail in the music and speech. Plug in cord that would be easily replaced if broken or damaged Cons: A lack of sound warmth Needs an amp They are a bit heavy

Rating
Nickname
josh
Summary
A great, durable, comfortable, and excellent sounding headphone
Location
South California
Posted on
8/10/2011
Recommended?
Yes

I bought these to add to my headphone collection and I am very impressed. The sound is great, I mean top notch, even better than my AKG's. The bass is low, and controlled, and actually very accurate, not sloppy, and or thrashy, lots of quality bass. The midrange is accurate to a "T" , not tinny, or hollow, not a frequency is missed. The highs are sharp, and again accurate, not screechy, or ear splitting. Put em on close your eyes and they'll take you right to the mosh pit, or the concert hall. In movies they sound great too. One thing to note about these is that they will bring out EVERYTHING in a song, even defects, so use with high quality/bitrate songs when possible. The soundstage is nice, and expansive despite what some say. If the song has a wide sound stage, these will reproduce it, if the song has the sound right to your ears, then it'll be right in your ears. These isolate well, yet do not sound like closed, they sound more open. The build quality is very excellent, they are solid, and well built. Unlike many headphones these dont creak or groan when you move them trying to put them on or take them off. The cord easily removes from the left side with a bayonet lock. The fit is very good, at least for me, but someone with a head much smaller than mine may have a issue. These dont clamp hard or move around much, and feel great even after hours of wear. The earpads are smooth, and comfy, not overly padded but not lacking either, giving a very good seal. The headband is very thick, very padded, and feels solid as rock. One thing tho, is these are pretty hefty bad boys. It may take a few sessions to get used to the weight. Pros: top notch sound top notch quality top notch comfort top bang per buck out there. Cons: none

Rating
Nickname
Drake
Summary
Shure SRH840
Location
hilo, HI
Posted on
6/21/2011
Recommended?
Yes

I just got my headphones the other day and even though I haven't done the 100 hrs of burn in, I have to say I'm really impressed with these. Pros: -Tight rich bass -Comfortable -highs aren't too bright. -Mids are neutral for all sorts of music -sound stage just right Cons: -Sound stage isn't as large as the higher end and more expensive headphones.

Rating
Nickname
George
Summary
VERY HOT Headphones !!!
Location
NYC
Posted on
6/21/2011
Recommended?
Yes

I just received these headphone. I put them on using my ipod outside at a Barbecue. As i put them on for 10 seconds and started to jam THEY FELL OFF AND LANDED IN THE BARBECUE PIT !!! BUT THEY SOUNDED HOT WHILE THEY LASTED VERY HOT .I WAS WONDERING IS THE WARRANTY STILL GOOD !! Pros: HOT HEADPHONES !! VERY HOT !! Cons: MAKE SURE THEY ARE TIGHT ON YOUR HEAD BEFORE YOU LISTEN !! AND STAY AWAY FROM BARBECUE PIT'S !!

Merchant Response:

Hi George, Sorry for the "bbq accident" ;) Call Shure at 1-800-516-2525 and see if they can help you with that. Thanks and be safe :)

Rating
Nickname
AL
Summary
BEST DAMN HEADPHONES FOR ITS PRICE.
Location
SCARBOROUGH,ONTARIO, CANADA
Posted on
6/21/2011
Recommended?
Yes

I always loved the sound from Shure's SE530. I thought its was too pricey and then this came along. It was a godsend to have the same sound signature in a headphone. Its definitely the most bang for the buck. Pros: Detailed Very comfortable Price Build Cons: Narrow soundstage Wires in the side worries me

Rating
Nickname
Venkata Kousik
Summary
Review: Shure SRH840 [A Brief Comparison To HFI-780]
Location
London, Essex
Posted on
6/21/2011
Recommended?
Yes

Ever since I saw the first post by Jude (The Admin) about the announcement of Shure's new professional series of headphones I've always wanted to purchase one from this line up. I thought of 440s at first, but when I had a look at their respective prices I decided and made up my mind to go for the 840s given the arguably best price for such a set of cans. Then I've waited for these things to show up in the real world and was a constant follower of the Leak thread here at Head-Fi. Finally the time had come for these to show up and I saw this thread. When I saw Quinto's impressions I've finalized my purchase at the expense of parting my HD 600s off to another responsible owner. The Way They Make Me Feel: These things aren't kind of eye catchers or head turners when you first look at them. They don't look as cool as 780s either. To be honest they reminded me of HD 280 Pros I used to own in appearance (Nowhere near the SQ wise though). As far as the comfort goes these things feel quite heavy compared to the 780s. At first I felt as if I had an evenly distributed dense monster over my head and I even felt a bit dizzy as "The Marching Mule" quoted in his impressions earlier, but soon that feeling disappears. The ear pads are sort of super comfy compared 780s or any other closed ones I've had experience with apart from Denons and Bose Triports. The spare ear pads and detachable cable are a real nice touch and I've always wanted my 780s to have the same. The only "Con" I've got in my point of view is the alien cable on top each ear cup that goes into the headband. I feel that thing to be a bit fragile compared to all the other things which are on the "Pros" side. The Sound: I have done all the testing with my Sony D-171 PCDP and a bit through iPod just for source comparison sake. To start with the source has been loaded with a beautifully re-mastered compilation CD of Neil Young's Greatest Hits. What a start that would be to start auditioning a nice and balanced sounding rig (To my ears). The track "Down By The River" which starts with a bit of noisy background (Vinyl conversion may be) the strings will start to strum in such a way that your mind wobbles and would start to appreciate how good a guitar can sound and how wonderful a piece of an instrument that would be. The SRH840s have a great prowess in delivering the nuances that are associated with the string strum whereas the 780s had the similar sort of authority but looked a bit of out of balance. There is another track "Old Man" which can be used to test the actual balance of the entire spectrum where the vocals (mids) will start to pick up along with the opening of great guitar strum. I felt the 840s had a great tonal balance compared to the 780s when rendering the string laid vocals. To test the full potential of any pair of headphones you've got to test them across all genres: To achieve this I have loaded my player with Bill Evans' "Waltz For Debby" and boy wasn't I surprised over these cans ability to deliver. This particular CD sounds as if it's been recorded in binaural. I am not sure about this. They have delivered each and every piece and participle of this particular recording in a superbly refined manner. 780s sound great with Jazz as well but the 840s have shown more versatility handling this particular master at work kind of recording from the great Bill Evans. 840s proved themselves that they have got the upper hand in delivering the detail with a sort of rich tonal balance compared to the 780s. People chirping, talking and coughing in the background have been handled in an outstanding way compared to the 780s. Afterwards I've decided to reload my source with Rock and this time it's "The Mothership", Led Zeppelin's compilation of their greatest hits. The first track I've played was "Achilles Last Stand" and this particular track starts with a lot of bang and strum. And the vocals will start to pickup straight after the grand opening. The thrash of cymbals has got more texture compared to the slightly harsh and eardrum piercing texture of 780s. That doesn't mean that 780s aren't enjoyable, they have got their own slam and pace attack, but 840s have got better pace and the way of controlling & defining things. Well after this much of intensive comparison I've decided to load the source with Diana Krall and Alison Krauss to have a measure at these cans capability of handling female vocals. I wasn't disappointed at all. They made me so excited over the great reproduction of female vocals that I had goose bumps all over in more than one instance. With regards to vocals they deliver them in such a way that each and every word becomes more audible. I've never seen this phenomenon with any other cans I've heard so far with such a detail (Could be because of their outstanding tonal balance). To finish off this exhausting assignment I've finally decided to load some random mixture of genres with trance, hip-hip, techno and electronica. The underlying string bass-line reproduction is outstanding with 840s. For instance if you've ever listened to Tony Toni Tone's "Let's Get Down" you'll notice that part where it's played throughout the track in the background. With 840s you don't have to search for the detail whereas 780s would make you run for the detail. If I've to give a single line description for both these cans' attitude towards reproduction I would say: HFI-780: "Come and get me to get served" SRH840: "Stay here and I'll serve everything" Thanks for the read and sorry about creating another thread for the 840s. I felt this would get lost and would be a little big to blend into the Quinto's impressions thread. Ven Pros: Comfort, Detail, Resolution, Flat Response Cons: Proprietary Connector, Slightly Narrow Soundstage

Rating
Nickname
Jeffrey Han
Summary
Shure SRH-840 Professional Monitoring Headphone Review
Location
Saratoga, CA
Posted on
6/21/2011
Recommended?
Yes

Review of Shure SRH-840 Professional Monitoring Headphones To begin with, I feel that a personal introduction is needed. I've always been one for a Big Sound, Small Price kind of mindset. My endeavors in this regard have left me with the Ultrasone HFI-780 Headphones, which I considered to be my reference. That was until I made the most excellent decision to purchase the Shure SRH-840s. To be honest, it was initially a impulse based buy, but I grew more and more pleased with each day of ownership. Headphone Solutions, a store that I respect and admire greatly, can only be described as a store centered around the satisfaction of the customer. They were eager to answer my questions, as evidenced by their quick, yet effective replies. I would highly recommend purchasing from this store. My un-boxing impressions can be described as very impressed. The box was very nicely packaged, and was very neatly organized. I'm sure that the contents are viewable elsewhere, but for reference, the package includes: 1 Pair of Shure SRH-840 1 Set of Extra Earpads 1 Coiled Cable 1 1/8" to 1/4" Adapter Right off the bat, I was surprised with the size of the headphones. They are indeed bigger than most headphones that I have tried, especially the HFI-780. Putting on the headphones, I immediately was relieved that they are way more comfortable than the HFI-780s, which create a clamping force that discourages long term listening. However, the lack of clamping force may be initially offsetting to many. For the first week, I was afraid that the headphones would fall off my head. Clearly, these are home use headphones, especially since they do not fit flush with your head. The sides extend out so much that you appear foolish outside. I for one, would certainly avoid wearing these outside as much as possible. Regardless, it is certainly possible to wear these outside, since they are extremely durable. I generally have a favorable impression of the coiled cable. Many have stated that they would like a shorter, or straight cable. I am perfectly fine with the coiled cable, since it helps keep the mess of cables more organized. Now, onto the most important part; sound. My music during this period of time is heavily classical, due to the demanding quality that it possesses. It puts every aspect of a headphone to the test, and allows for utmost scrutiny. For the purposes of this review, my setup is as follows: Sony Vaio Laptop → AMB Gamma Y1 → Pete Millett Starving Student → SRH-840 Sansa Clip/Cowon D2 → AMB Mini^3 → SRH-840 These headphones are not particularly demanding powerwise, though they definitely do scale nicely with higher quality amps. I'm a DIY hybrid type of guy, since I enjoy the lush quality of tubes, yet the cleanliness of solid state amps. Highs: Coming from the HFI-780, the highs can come as either a relief or shock. Assuming that like me, the treble was a tad too harsh, even after burn-in, the treble will seem near perfect. It has the same depth of tonality, yet avoids having a harsh sibilance. I like the highs of this headphone very much. Mids: The mids are again very different when compared to the Ultrasone HFI-780s. Because the Treble and Bass of the Ultrasone are so dominant, the mids can sound recessed. Lacking sibilance and overpowering bass, the Shures find a perfect middle ground. The mids are sweet, lush, with a butterlike quality that is suitable for any genre. Bass: Oh man, this is where it gets subjective. I generally aim for a more neutral tone, though I do enjoy quality bass. The Ultrasone HFI-780 to me was only acceptable, because they tend to overpower and dominate the rest of the sound spectrum. The Shures have, in contrast, �less bass�, but the quality is definitely there. To me, this is perfectly acceptable. Whats important is that it doesn't distort, always retaining a clean, crisp quality to it. However, that does not mean that they are bass lightweights. When called upon in songs, the bass will definitely appear in the appropriate amounts. Otherwise, it is merely present, and not overpowering. Soundstage/Separation: For orchestral music, this is vital. Instrument separation is crucial to getting the most out of the music. The Ultrasones impose a virtual soundstage with its S-Logic technology, which is nothing more than a different positioning of the drivers. The Shures have excellent soundstage and separation. This leads to the Shures having a great more detail presentation than the Ultrasones. Conclusion: Overall, I'm very pleased with these headphones. They have a very different tonal quality than the Ultrasones, so it suits my needs perfectly. For the money, they are a bargain, and should be valued as such. After about 3 months of owning this headphone, I'm extremely satisfied with the results. Do they replace the Ultrasones? No. However, they contrast perfectly and make a very suitable companion for my HFI-780s. Cheers, --Jeff P.S. The included picture shows just how durable these headphones are. Feel free to toss them about. Even though they are made of mostly plastic, I have no qualms with throwing them around. Pros: - Very durable -Exceptional comfort - Very attractive price -Excellent sound quality -Detachable Cable, keep in mind that I really like the coiled cable. - Extra Earpads Cons: -Feeling on head is weird, since the clamp is minimal. - Huge form factor. Can be used for portable, but I would highly discourage it.

Rating
Nickname
Kris
Summary
Stunning
Location
Chicago, Illinois
Posted on
6/21/2011
Recommended?
Yes

All I can say is that the listening experience is stunning - absolutely beautiful and far, far better than the high-end ear buds I've been using to listen to my music. I don't have a place in my life right now to crank my music through speakers, and the time I can get to enjoy my music is now improved by a factor of 100. I can't say enough about how great these headphones sound. Pros: Fantastic bass and literally stunning sound. Cons: They are big, over the ear headphones - and so have that drawbacks. But the sound overcomes this for me.

Rating
Nickname
S.
Summary
Good, affordable closed headphone
Location
Boulder, CO
Posted on
6/21/2011
Recommended?
Yes

As an avid headphone collector (of sorts), over the past few years I've gone through a lot of closed headphones ("sealed" headphones that provide isolation) in order to find a good-sounding transportable solution. Since 2006 I've gone through a lot of headphones including the Sennheiser PX200; AKG K81DJ, K171S, & K271S; Sony MDR-V6 & CD3000; Audio-Technica ATH-FC7, ATH-ES5, ATH-OR7, & ATH-A900; and Beyerdynamic DT770-80 & DT250-80. Last year I finally settled on the Audio-Technica ATH-ES7, IMO a good compromise between portability and sound. But things just never stay static in the headphone world and when Shure released the SRH840, well I decided I just had to try it. Because I'm a headphone collector and that's what I do. ;) I can't compare the SRH840 to any of the headphones I've previously owned of course, but I will say that after listening to it over the past several months (have had it since December '09), I think it's a very good headphone, in fact probably one of the better ones that can be had for less than $200. It's clear-sounding with good separation & distinction between the various musical elements, with solid bass and treble, and there's even sort of a soundstage too, though it's a bit narrow and shallow. Music is clear and distinct, broken down into the separate voices & instruments so you can hear each one. Treble is clean & quick without being harsh (so you can properly hear things like percussion strikes & fast plucks on guitars), but the SRH840 might be considered relatively bass-light, as it doesn't have a whole lot of boom or impact in the bass & mid-bass range. I wouldn't call it a bassy headphone by any stretch, but at least it has good bass depth and low extension. This doesn't really save it from being an iffy choice for electronica though (like The Crystal Method or The Prodigy) and I'd probably recommend looking elsewhere if that's what you listen to. Compared to the ATH-ES7, the SRH840 has a less "colored" sound without as forward of a mid-range and has more treble quantity along with more of a relative tilt towards the treble in general. Soundstage is a bit bigger than on the ATH-ES7, but only by a little, as it's still relatively small (think Grado-like small, if you've heard a Grado). Both play rock music well enough, but I'd have to give the edge to the SRH840 primarily on metal music, be it heavy, thrash, or prog. Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Disturbed, System of a Down, Testament, Megadeth, Beyond Twilight, and Symphony X (among others) sound appropriately "thrashy," fast, and clear (notably on overdriven or distorted guitars, bass guitars, & drums). I found the SRH840 to actually be a great headphone for metal specifically due to its strong clarity and speed response. Not that it can't play other genres well though, as it also did an ok job with classical, jazz, indie & alt-rock, and bluegrass. I'd call it a decent all-rounder - not exceptional for any one genre but acceptable for most. Not every aspect about the SRH840's sound quality is good though. Decay (as in attack & decay) feels extremely short even for a closed headphone (inherent to most closed headphones but not all). Related to the decay, there's also an odd reverb effect that can be distracting depending on what kind of music is being played (can be more easily noticed with jazz, for example). The music can sometimes feel like it's trapped in the acoustics of a large, sonically reflective room - this *can* be a good thing of course but it's an added quality that shouldn't be there. Lastly, the SRH840 isn't very "smooth" or "musical" sounding compared to my ATH-ES7, with its separated and "differentiated" sound - which I'm sure helps for monitoring but doesn't always translate to enjoyment of every music genre. There are a few physical issues too. First, the indented numbered "click" positions for fit adjustment are really soft and don't stay in place nearly as well as my hard-stepped ATH-ES7. Second, the positions are numbered 1-10 and I use 7 on my small-ish head, so I could see people with large heads unable to get a good fit. Third, wearing the headphones for long sessions can get uncomfortable due to ear sore even though there isn't that much pressure on the ears. And fourth, the telephone-like coiled cord can be a hassle to deal with. Fortunately it's removeable and straight cords might be available in the future. As for PC gaming & DVD movies, the SRH840 is less than stellar in that area, at least for me. In games like Half-Life 2, Far Cry, & Crysis, gunfire and explosions don't have nearly as much impact & boom as on my ATH-ES7. Its treble does outline bullet effects nicely, but this tends to outweigh the actual gunfire effect and can make shotguns, submachine guns, & assault rifles sound more like handguns. And the SRH840 isn't any better than my ATH-ES7 for directional positioning either - not really any easier to locate enemies by ear. As for DVD movies, well it's probably easy to extrapolate how this affects genres such as action, sci-fi & fantasy, and comic-book adaptations (Black Hawk Down, District 9, Lord of the Rings, Terminator 2, The Dark Knight, etc). That said, the SRH840 is still a fine headphone though with a few strong positive aspects, enough for me to recommend it for at least 50% of the discriminating & aspiring headphone listeners out there looking for an affordable closed headphone. I ended up preferring the ATH-ES7 myself but the SRH840 sounds good on its own too, easily better than the ATH-ES7 for metal music. ;) (Though you probably don't want to headbang too hard, as it will probably fall off.) ;) Equipment used: Arcam FMJ CD36 CD player with HeadAmp Gilmore Lite and DIY M3 headphone amps. Pros: - good level of detail and instrument separation & clarity - moderately fast impulse response - very isolating, durable - fold-able design Cons: - small soundstage - short decay & added reverb can be distracting - fit may be too small for large heads - ear sore can result from long sessions - bulky size - sound not optimal without a dedicated headphone amp - needs about 200 hours of burn-in for optimal sound

Rating
Nickname
M T
Summary
Studio sound
Location
Texas
Posted on
2/27/2011
Recommended?
Yes

These sound like you are in the studio with the recording artist. They are great for digital devices really help make the sound come through. I own a pair of Dr Dre studio and I believe that these headphones sound just as clear. Nice tone with the bass, great stereo effect, great mids and the highs are almost ear piercing overall great set! Very pleased!! Pros: Light weight, good all around fit Cons:

Rating
Nickname
S.
Summary
Good, affordable closed headphone
Location
Boulder, CO
Posted on
4/8/2010
Recommended?
Yes

As an avid headphone collector (of sorts), over the past few years I've gone through a lot of closed headphones ("sealed" headphones that provide isolation) in order to find a good-sounding transportable solution. Since 2006 I've gone through a lot of headphones including the Sennheiser PX200; AKG K81DJ, K171S, & K271S; Sony MDR-V6 & CD3000; Audio-Technica ATH-FC7, ATH-ES5, ATH-OR7, & ATH-A900; and Beyerdynamic DT770-80 & DT250-80. Last year I finally settled on the Audio-Technica ATH-ES7, IMO a good compromise between portability and sound. But things just never stay static in the headphone world and when Shure released the SRH840, well I decided I just had to try it. Because I'm a headphone collector and that's what I do. ;) I can't compare the SRH840 to any of the headphones I've previously owned of course, but I will say that after listening to it over the past several months (have had it since December '09), I think it's a very good headphone, in fact probably one of the better ones that can be had for less than $200. It's clear-sounding with good separation & distinction between the various musical elements, with solid bass and treble, and there's even sort of a soundstage too, though it's a bit narrow and shallow. Music is clear and distinct, broken down into the separate voices & instruments so you can hear each one. Treble is clean & quick without being harsh (so you can properly hear things like percussion strikes & fast plucks on guitars), but the SRH840 might be considered relatively bass-light, as it doesn't have a whole lot of boom or impact in the bass & mid-bass range. I wouldn't call it a bassy headphone by any stretch, but at least it has good bass depth and low extension. This doesn't really save it from being an iffy choice for electronica though (like The Crystal Method or The Prodigy) and I'd probably recommend looking elsewhere if that's what you listen to. Compared to the ATH-ES7, the SRH840 has a less "colored" sound without as forward of a mid-range and has more treble quantity along with more of a relative tilt towards the treble in general. Soundstage is a bit bigger than on the ATH-ES7, but only by a little, as it's still relatively small (think Grado-like small, if you've heard a Grado). Both play rock music well enough, but I'd have to give the edge to the SRH840 primarily on metal music, be it heavy, thrash, or prog. Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Disturbed, System of a Down, Testament, Megadeth, Beyond Twilight, and Symphony X (among others) sound appropriately "thrashy," fast, and clear (notably on overdriven or distorted guitars, bass guitars, & drums). I found the SRH840 to actually be a great headphone for metal specifically due to its strong clarity and speed response. Not that it can't play other genres well though, as it also did an ok job with classical, jazz, indie & alt-rock, and bluegrass. I'd call it a decent all-rounder - not exceptional for any one genre but acceptable for most. Not every aspect about the SRH840's sound quality is good though. Decay (as in attack & decay) feels extremely short even for a closed headphone (inherent to most closed headphones but not all). Related to the decay, there's also an odd reverb effect that can be distracting depending on what kind of music is being played (can be more easily noticed with jazz, for example). The music can sometimes feel like it's trapped in the acoustics of a large, sonically reflective room - this *can* be a good thing of course but it's an added quality that shouldn't be there. Lastly, the SRH840 isn't very "smooth" or "musical" sounding compared to my ATH-ES7, with its separated and "differentiated" sound - which I'm sure helps for monitoring but doesn't always translate to enjoyment of every music genre. There are a few physical issues too. First, the indented numbered "click" positions for fit adjustment are really soft and don't stay in place nearly as well as my hard-stepped ATH-ES7. Second, the positions are numbered 1-10 and I use 7 on my small-ish head, so I could see people with large heads unable to get a good fit. Third, wearing the headphones for long sessions can get uncomfortable due to ear sore even though there isn't that much pressure on the ears. And fourth, the telephone-like coiled cord can be a hassle to deal with. Fortunately it's removeable and straight cords might be available in the future. As for PC gaming & DVD movies, the SRH840 is less than stellar in that area, at least for me. In games like Half-Life 2, Far Cry, & Crysis, gunfire and explosions don't have nearly as much impact & boom as on my ATH-ES7. Its treble does outline bullet effects nicely, but this tends to outweigh the actual gunfire effect and can make shotguns, submachine guns, & assault rifles sound more like handguns. And the SRH840 isn't any better than my ATH-ES7 for directional positioning either - not really any easier to locate enemies by ear. As for DVD movies, well it's probably easy to extrapolate how this affects genres such as action, sci-fi & fantasy, and comic-book adaptations (Black Hawk Down, District 9, Lord of the Rings, Terminator 2, The Dark Knight, etc). That said, the SRH840 is still a fine headphone though with a few strong positive aspects, enough for me to recommend it for at least 50% of the discriminating & aspiring headphone listeners out there looking for an affordable closed headphone. I ended up preferring the ATH-ES7 myself but the SRH840 sounds good on its own too, easily better than the ATH-ES7 for metal music. ;) (Though you probably don't want to headbang too hard, as it will probably fall off.) ;) Equipment used: Arcam FMJ CD36 CD player with HeadAmp Gilmore Lite and DIY M3 headphone amps. Pros: - good level of detail and instrument separation & clarity - moderately fast impulse response - very isolating, durable - fold-able design Cons: - small soundstage - short decay & added reverb can be distracting - fit may be too small for large heads - ear sore can result from long sessions - bulky size - sound not optimal without a dedicated headphone amp - needs about 200 hours of burn-in for optimal sound

Rating
Nickname
Kris
Summary
Stunning
Location
Chicago, Illinois
Posted on
1/21/2010
Recommended?
Yes

All I can say is that the listening experience is stunning - absolutely beautiful and far, far better than the high-end ear buds I've been using to listen to my music. I don't have a place in my life right now to crank my music through speakers, and the time I can get to enjoy my music is now improved by a factor of 100. I can't say enough about how great these headphones sound. Pros: Fantastic bass and literally stunning sound. Cons: They are big, over the ear headphones - and so have that drawbacks. But the sound overcomes this for me.

Rating
Nickname
Jeffrey Han
Summary
Shure SRH-840 Professional Monitoring Headphone Review
Location
Saratoga, CA
Posted on
12/1/2009
Recommended?
Yes

Review of Shure SRH-840 Professional Monitoring Headphones To begin with, I feel that a personal introduction is needed. I've always been one for a Big Sound, Small Price kind of mindset. My endeavors in this regard have left me with the Ultrasone HFI-780 Headphones, which I considered to be my reference. That was until I made the most excellent decision to purchase the Shure SRH-840s. To be honest, it was initially a impulse based buy, but I grew more and more pleased with each day of ownership. Headphone Solutions, a store that I respect and admire greatly, can only be described as a store centered around the satisfaction of the customer. They were eager to answer my questions, as evidenced by their quick, yet effective replies. I would highly recommend purchasing from this store. My un-boxing impressions can be described as very impressed. The box was very nicely packaged, and was very neatly organized. I'm sure that the contents are viewable elsewhere, but for reference, the package includes: 1 Pair of Shure SRH-840 1 Set of Extra Earpads 1 Coiled Cable 1 1/8" to 1/4" Adapter Right off the bat, I was surprised with the size of the headphones. They are indeed bigger than most headphones that I have tried, especially the HFI-780. Putting on the headphones, I immediately was relieved that they are way more comfortable than the HFI-780s, which create a clamping force that discourages long term listening. However, the lack of clamping force may be initially offsetting to many. For the first week, I was afraid that the headphones would fall off my head. Clearly, these are home use headphones, especially since they do not fit flush with your head. The sides extend out so much that you appear foolish outside. I for one, would certainly avoid wearing these outside as much as possible. Regardless, it is certainly possible to wear these outside, since they are extremely durable. I generally have a favorable impression of the coiled cable. Many have stated that they would like a shorter, or straight cable. I am perfectly fine with the coiled cable, since it helps keep the mess of cables more organized. Now, onto the most important part; sound. My music during this period of time is heavily classical, due to the demanding quality that it possesses. It puts every aspect of a headphone to the test, and allows for utmost scrutiny. For the purposes of this review, my setup is as follows: Sony Vaio Laptop → AMB Gamma Y1 → Pete Millett Starving Student → SRH-840 Sansa Clip/Cowon D2 → AMB Mini^3 → SRH-840 These headphones are not particularly demanding powerwise, though they definitely do scale nicely with higher quality amps. I'm a DIY hybrid type of guy, since I enjoy the lush quality of tubes, yet the cleanliness of solid state amps. Highs: Coming from the HFI-780, the highs can come as either a relief or shock. Assuming that like me, the treble was a tad too harsh, even after burn-in, the treble will seem near perfect. It has the same depth of tonality, yet avoids having a harsh sibilance. I like the highs of this headphone very much. Mids: The mids are again very different when compared to the Ultrasone HFI-780s. Because the Treble and Bass of the Ultrasone are so dominant, the mids can sound recessed. Lacking sibilance and overpowering bass, the Shures find a perfect middle ground. The mids are sweet, lush, with a butterlike quality that is suitable for any genre. Bass: Oh man, this is where it gets subjective. I generally aim for a more neutral tone, though I do enjoy quality bass. The Ultrasone HFI-780 to me was only acceptable, because they tend to overpower and dominate the rest of the sound spectrum. The Shures have, in contrast, �less bass�, but the quality is definitely there. To me, this is perfectly acceptable. Whats important is that it doesn't distort, always retaining a clean, crisp quality to it. However, that does not mean that they are bass lightweights. When called upon in songs, the bass will definitely appear in the appropriate amounts. Otherwise, it is merely present, and not overpowering. Soundstage/Separation: For orchestral music, this is vital. Instrument separation is crucial to getting the most out of the music. The Ultrasones impose a virtual soundstage with its S-Logic technology, which is nothing more than a different positioning of the drivers. The Shures have excellent soundstage and separation. This leads to the Shures having a great more detail presentation than the Ultrasones. Conclusion: Overall, I'm very pleased with these headphones. They have a very different tonal quality than the Ultrasones, so it suits my needs perfectly. For the money, they are a bargain, and should be valued as such. After about 3 months of owning this headphone, I'm extremely satisfied with the results. Do they replace the Ultrasones? No. However, they contrast perfectly and make a very suitable companion for my HFI-780s. Cheers, --Jeff P.S. The included picture shows just how durable these headphones are. Feel free to toss them about. Even though they are made of mostly plastic, I have no qualms with throwing them around. Pros: - Very durable -Exceptional comfort - Very attractive price -Excellent sound quality -Detachable Cable, keep in mind that I really like the coiled cable. - Extra Earpads Cons: -Feeling on head is weird, since the clamp is minimal. - Huge form factor. Can be used for portable, but I would highly discourage it.

Rating
Nickname
Venkata Kousik
Summary
Review: Shure SRH840 [A Brief Comparison To HFI-780]
Location
London, Essex
Posted on
11/13/2009
Recommended?
Yes

Ever since I saw the first post by Jude (The Admin) about the announcement of Shure's new professional series of headphones I've always wanted to purchase one from this line up. I thought of 440s at first, but when I had a look at their respective prices I decided and made up my mind to go for the 840s given the arguably best price for such a set of cans. Then I've waited for these things to show up in the real world and was a constant follower of the Leak thread here at Head-Fi. Finally the time had come for these to show up and I saw this thread. When I saw Quinto's impressions I've finalized my purchase at the expense of parting my HD 600s off to another responsible owner. The Way They Make Me Feel: These things aren't kind of eye catchers or head turners when you first look at them. They don't look as cool as 780s either. To be honest they reminded me of HD 280 Pros I used to own in appearance (Nowhere near the SQ wise though). As far as the comfort goes these things feel quite heavy compared to the 780s. At first I felt as if I had an evenly distributed dense monster over my head and I even felt a bit dizzy as "The Marching Mule" quoted in his impressions earlier, but soon that feeling disappears. The ear pads are sort of super comfy compared 780s or any other closed ones I've had experience with apart from Denons and Bose Triports. The spare ear pads and detachable cable are a real nice touch and I've always wanted my 780s to have the same. The only "Con" I've got in my point of view is the alien cable on top each ear cup that goes into the headband. I feel that thing to be a bit fragile compared to all the other things which are on the "Pros" side. The Sound: I have done all the testing with my Sony D-171 PCDP and a bit through iPod just for source comparison sake. To start with the source has been loaded with a beautifully re-mastered compilation CD of Neil Young's Greatest Hits. What a start that would be to start auditioning a nice and balanced sounding rig (To my ears). The track "Down By The River" which starts with a bit of noisy background (Vinyl conversion may be) the strings will start to strum in such a way that your mind wobbles and would start to appreciate how good a guitar can sound and how wonderful a piece of an instrument that would be. The SRH840s have a great prowess in delivering the nuances that are associated with the string strum whereas the 780s had the similar sort of authority but looked a bit of out of balance. There is another track "Old Man" which can be used to test the actual balance of the entire spectrum where the vocals (mids) will start to pick up along with the opening of great guitar strum. I felt the 840s had a great tonal balance compared to the 780s when rendering the string laid vocals. To test the full potential of any pair of headphones you've got to test them across all genres: To achieve this I have loaded my player with Bill Evans' "Waltz For Debby" and boy wasn't I surprised over these cans ability to deliver. This particular CD sounds as if it's been recorded in binaural. I am not sure about this. They have delivered each and every piece and participle of this particular recording in a superbly refined manner. 780s sound great with Jazz as well but the 840s have shown more versatility handling this particular master at work kind of recording from the great Bill Evans. 840s proved themselves that they have got the upper hand in delivering the detail with a sort of rich tonal balance compared to the 780s. People chirping, talking and coughing in the background have been handled in an outstanding way compared to the 780s. Afterwards I've decided to reload my source with Rock and this time it's "The Mothership", Led Zeppelin's compilation of their greatest hits. The first track I've played was "Achilles Last Stand" and this particular track starts with a lot of bang and strum. And the vocals will start to pickup straight after the grand opening. The thrash of cymbals has got more texture compared to the slightly harsh and eardrum piercing texture of 780s. That doesn't mean that 780s aren't enjoyable, they have got their own slam and pace attack, but 840s have got better pace and the way of controlling & defining things. Well after this much of intensive comparison I've decided to load the source with Diana Krall and Alison Krauss to have a measure at these cans capability of handling female vocals. I wasn't disappointed at all. They made me so excited over the great reproduction of female vocals that I had goose bumps all over in more than one instance. With regards to vocals they deliver them in such a way that each and every word becomes more audible. I've never seen this phenomenon with any other cans I've heard so far with such a detail (Could be because of their outstanding tonal balance). To finish off this exhausting assignment I've finally decided to load some random mixture of genres with trance, hip-hip, techno and electronica. The underlying string bass-line reproduction is outstanding with 840s. For instance if you've ever listened to Tony Toni Tone's "Let's Get Down" you'll notice that part where it's played throughout the track in the background. With 840s you don't have to search for the detail whereas 780s would make you run for the detail. If I've to give a single line description for both these cans' attitude towards reproduction I would say: HFI-780: "Come and get me to get served" SRH840: "Stay here and I'll serve everything" Thanks for the read and sorry about creating another thread for the 840s. I felt this would get lost and would be a little big to blend into the Quinto's impressions thread. Ven Pros: Comfort, Detail, Resolution, Flat Response Cons: Proprietary Connector, Slightly Narrow Soundstage

Rating
Nickname
AL
Summary
BEST DAMN HEADPHONES FOR ITS PRICE.
Location
SCARBOROUGH,ONTARIO, CANADA
Posted on
9/15/2009
Recommended?
Yes

I always loved the sound from Shure's SE530. I thought its was too pricey and then this came along. It was a godsend to have the same sound signature in a headphone. Its definitely the most bang for the buck. Pros: Detailed Very comfortable Price Build Cons: Narrow soundstage Wires in the side worrys me

Rating
Nickname
George
Summary
VERY HOT Headphones !!!
Location
NYC.
Posted on
8/4/2009
Recommended?
Yes

I just received these headphone. I put them on using my ipod outside at a Barbecue. As i put them on for 10 seconds and started to jam THEY FELL OFF AND LANDED IN THE BARBECUE PIT !!! BUT THEY SOUNDED HOT WHILE THEY LASTED VERY HOT .I WAS WONDERING IS THE WARRANTY STILL GOOD !! Pros: HOT HEADPHONES !! VERY HOT !! Cons: MAKE SURE THEY ARE TIGHT ON YOUR HEAD BEFORE YOU LISTEN !! AND STAY AWAY FROM BARBECUE PIT'S !!

Rating
Nickname
Drake
Summary
Shure SRH840
Location
hilo, HI
Posted on
7/23/2009
Recommended?
Yes

I just got my headphones the other day and even though I haven't done the 100 hrs of burn in, I have to say Im really impressed with these. Pros: -Tight rich bass -Comfortable -highs aren't too bright. -Mids are neutral for all sorts of music -sound stage just right Cons: -Sound stage isn't as large as the higher end and more expensive headphones.

Question & Answers

Questions on Shure SRH840 Professional Monitoring Headphones

Questions on SRH840

5 Questions  |  5 Answers

Q.

can i use them with any ipod? else what do i need to connect the headphones to my ipod

asked by samuel

A.
Tech Support answered:
You can connect them to the iPod. You don't need anything since there is an adaptor included with the SRH840.
Q.

What a great site/store. I am going back to full time med-school (I'm 40), I have 4 small kids at home too. I'm looking for something to kill noise while I study on campus and home. I use my Mac laptop as source and I mostly listen to instrumental Indian Classical music relatively softly (it becomes like white noise). I thought noise-canceling headphones were the way to go until I read your site. Snag is I hate ear plugs - never been able to wear them. I feel pressure and throbbing. So I think in-ear headphones might not be suitable for me; though I might just try some. What over-ear headphones do you have that will isolate the ambient noises well enough even when I listen at low volumes? I'm more keen on noise reduction/isolation than pristine music quality (I've gotten used to the Mac laptop's speakers!). Would these Shure's be suitable (are there better isolating over-ear's) or am I wasting my time with over-ear for sound isolation, and must seriously look at in-ear types? Thanks for your advice.

asked by Steven

A.
Tech Support answered:
For noise isolation you need a closed design headphone or in-ear earphones.
The Shure SRH840 ia great for that but we cannot ship them to NZ.
Thank you.
Q.

Does this model have a microphone?

asked by Joel

A.
Tech Support answered:
No, this model does not come with a microphone.
Q.

right side of headphone stopped working.
Where can I find replacement cable or repair service?

asked by Zacnorman

A.
Tech Support answered:
We apologize for the inconvenience. All Shure headphones and earphones are covered by a 2 year warranty. Even if the product is out-of-warranty, Shure will fix it for a fee. Please contact Shure directly for further assistance: 1-800-516-2525
Q.

Hello,

I was planning to buy shure srh840 for my small studio setup.
I have the following:-
M audio fast track pro
Yamaha hs80m
M audio oxygen 3rd gen

I don't have an acoustically treated room? Would I be needing a dedicated headphone amp with shure as the fast track already has an amp? If yes, suggest a few. I am a beginner at this, and still under a learning curve.

asked by Vaid

A.
Tech Support answered:
You do not need a dedicated amp for the SRH840, they have a very low impedance and were designed to provide the monitoring performance without the "equipment" that is normally used in big studios.